Tens of thousands of displaced South Sudanese live in UN camps without safe access to water

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Some 25,000 people live in two hastily arranged camps in Juba, two weeks after violence broke out in the capital of South Sudan. Nearly 40,000 are in camps elsewhere in the country.

At the medical aid tent run by Doctors Without Borders, medics treat diarrhea and severe dehydration. It’s a sign people don’t have access to safe water. The camp’s population density is much too high, says a doctor here, Christine Bimansha.

Makeshift tents are constructed out of towels, sheets and sticks. Wet clothes are draped on barbed wire fence. People sitting in plastic chairs sell pastries, water and a charge for a mobile phone. Dishes are rinsed in tubs of mud-brown sludge.

Read the full report by Jason Straziuso and photo’s by Ben Curtis, Associated Press: http://tr.im/4p5fy.

Compare the Hippo Water Roller Case Study on the South Sudan: https://www.hipporoller.org/rollout/evalution-feedback/case-study-south-sudan

Displaced people do their daily chores such as bathing, washing clothes, cooking and fetching water at a United Nations compound which has become home to thousands of people displaced by the recent fighting, in the capital Juba, South Sudan Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013.

Displaced people gather around a water truck to fill containers.

A displaced child struggles to carry a container of drinking water obtained from a truck across a slippery muddy patch of ground.

A displaced girl carries a bowl of water on her head after filling it from a truck.

A displaced child holds the tyre he was using as a toy as he navigates across a muddy patch of ground to go fill an empty bottle with water from a truck.

A displaced girl stands on her flip-flops on a sheet of sacking as she tries to wash herself from a bottle of water filled from a nearby water truck, on a muddy patch of ground.